Archive for category Laevo

From Personal Information Management to Humane Interaction

While discussing file management in the paper on Laevo I presented today at the UIST conference, I conclude …

[…], in essence files are a remnant of the original desktop metaphor. Users are forced to mentally connect window representations to the files they represent. When restoring window configurations users are [unnecessarily] confronted with finding all the related files.

I reflect on this later in the discussion:

[…], raising interesting questions for further research on how window management can be redesigned to outgrow its original purpose. Further research on Laevo is therefore to increasingly move away from files, as their main intent of persisting information could be replaced by persisting window configurations […]

This is in line with an old post of mine on window management, where I concluded:

Taking this to the extreme: assume closing a window would be the same as deleting a file. Would you actually ever have to know about the underlying file system again? Window management and file management could become one and the same thing.

Originally I titled the current post, “From File Management to Time Management”, since one of the conceptual challenges I like to confront myself with is to design for never having to reopen a file again. Rather, I want to support revisiting the full context (including the window representation of the file) which the original file was part of. As a desktop interface, Laevo uses a temporal representation allowing you to revisit any prior, or planned activity in time.

However, after a yet again inspiring talk by Bret Victor on “The Humane Representation of Thought: a trail map for the 21st century” as the closing keynote of the UIST 2014 conference, I realized that just as file management is a remnant of the original desktop metaphor, so is window management. Windows are a side effect of the digital rectangles we’ve grown so accustomed to within our lives. Window representations are mere visual abstractions of richer concepts and ideas which could be expressed in entirely different ways using all of our senses, rather than being restricted to visual and symbolic notations. The reason why we stick to them is because they allow for dynamic (connected) behavior, which is where the tangible all-around-us world falls short. Following the same argument that we should be phasing out file management, so should we attempt to eliminate the need for window management. The more intermediate abstractions we can remove to interact with the concepts and ideas we actually want to address, the better.

Nonetheless, my underlying thesis remains. The temporal (and associated contextual) dimension is a very tangible, humane concept, we should continue to design for.

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Laevo presentation @ UIST 2014 conference

A first paper on Laevo has been accepted to the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) 2014 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Laevo: A Temporal Desktop Interface for Integrated Knowledge Work

I will be presenting the 8th of October, including a live demo of the system. Looking forward to the conference! The publication includes a 30s teaser and a longer video showcasing the different supported interactions.

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Start of Laevo user studies

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As part of my PhD I created Laevo, an alternate way by which work can be organized under Windows 7/8, and now it needs to be evaluated by several participants during a 2 week study. Laevo augments your current windows environment with a couple of extra options to organize your daily activities. The goal is you attempt to use these features during a full 2 week period, while continuing doing the activities you ordinarily do. How much you want to use the system is entirely up to you, but ideally you have it running during the full 2 weeks. You can either exit Leavo at the end of each day, or use Window’s sleep and hibernate functionality.

You would help me out greatly by installing Laevo, and trying it out. You can start the 2 week period of using it either on Monday the 5th, 12th or 19th of August. At the end of each day please give some feedback on your experiences with the system that day by shortly answering a set of questions. This shouldn’t take longer than 5 minutes/day. You can compile the feedback in one document and send it to me at the end of the 2 weeks (sjeu AT itu.dk).

  1. Why was or wasn’t Laevo useful for you today? At a minimum state one positive and one negative points, but open feedback is encouraged.
  2. What activities have you done today that weren’t represented in Laevo at some point?
  3. What was/were your main activities today? In case they were represented in Laevo, where did they originate from (self-initiated, to-do item, email to-do, other)?
  4. Have you scheduled any activities today? Did you also plan them on the time line? Why (not)?
  5. Did you use Leavo’s to-do list today? Why (not)? How?
  6. Did you use Laevo’s Activity Context library today to store or retrieve files?
  7. Were there occasions where you considered creating an activity or to-do item but eventually decided not to? If so, why?
  8. Please have a look at your time line. Does the overview of today reflect the actual activities you did today? Why (not)?

You can contact me for any information on sjeu AT itu.dk, but I will be out of office until the 11th of August.

When the application crashes there should be a “log.txt” file available in “C:\Users\<username>\Documents\Laevo”. Please email this to me. In case you continue encountering problems which severely hinder you from your work, please report them so I can try sending you a new version of Laevo to resolve the issues.

Please forward this to any participants which might be interested. Thank you for helping me out!

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Call for Laevo user study participants

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With great pleasure I can finally announce the first public installer of Laevo, a project I started out working on as part of my master’s thesis, and am now continuing working on as part of my PhD. In short, it allows you to organize your work in new ways which Windows traditionally doesn’t offer you. In case you spend most time of the day working on your PC you might be interested in trying it out. The project has come a long way and is finally ready for the greater public, hence I am looking forward to your input on what you think about the system. You would help me out greatly by installing Laevo, trying it out for one to two weeks, and giving feedback on it afterwards. Please send me an email (sjeu at itu.dk) or simply contact me in case you are interested in participating.

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You can download the latest version (v0.1.3) here. This is a more recent version than the one I linked to on twitter earlier this week. In case you already installed the previous version, simply uninstall the old version and install the new one. Your data and settings will be saved. To get you started I strongly advise you to quickly read through the manual so you know about the functionality offered.

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